This Freedom Day advocates of tobacco control are highlighting the power of the law to protect our rights to freedom and health, while calling for the passing of new legislation to free South Africa from addiction and other harms associated with the use of tobacco and related products including e-cigarettes.  “As we commemorate our first democratic elections, let’s celebrate the power of good governance and law to change lives for the better and protect our future.  We believe in creating a tobacco-free and nicotine-free South Africa.  The Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Control Bill, currently in parliament, will help us do that,” says Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS).


NCAS and other health organisations united under the Protect our Next initiative are hopeful the Bill can become law in 2023.  “Measures in the new Bill close loopholes and are set to reduce tobacco use,  exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke as well as the initiation of tobacco use by young people. It brings South Africa’s domestic legislation closer to full implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), a global standard captured as sustainable development Goal (SDG) target 3.a,” says Nyatsanza.

The first Global Adult Tobacco Survey conducted in South Africa (GATS-SA) conducted by the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) in 2021 shows high levels of tobacco use (29.4%) and second-hand smoke exposure in South Africa.  The research further shows strong public support for regulations, with nine out of ten adults supporting a ban on smoking in indoor workplaces and public places. Survey lead investigator and specialist scientist within the SAMRC’s Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Research Unit, Dr Catherine Egbe says, “A sick nation is a poor nation. Our communities want freedom from tobacco and the damage it causes to our health, our environment and our economy. The Bill includes carefully designed measures to achieve this and we need it to be urgently passed into law so we can move towards a tobacco-free, healthy nation.”

The Bill prohibits smoking and the use of e-cigarettes in enclosed public areas, such as restaurants, and will make certain outdoor public places 100% smoke-free too, ensuring South Africans are free from exposure to second-hand smoke. It will remove smoking areas on public conveyances and apply the 100% smoking ban to common areas of multi-unit residences. It further prohibits smoking and the use of electronic cigarettes in private dwellings used for commercial child care or education, and in cars carrying children under 18, rather than under 12 as is currently the case.

“Freedom from tobacco use means so many things – freedom to breathe, to be healthy, to live longer lives.  It frees our loved ones and communities from toxic second-hand smoke. It also gives hungry communities the freedom to spend more money on food, rather than tobacco,” says Sanele Zulu, Convenor of the South African Tobacco-Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). “Our young people need to make the right choices, but they also deserve better protection from the targeted marketing of tobacco and e-cigarette companies. The new Bill provides this protection.”

The Bill introduces uniform plain packaging for all brands and pictorial warnings on all packages.  Advertising of tobacco products, heated tobacco and electronic cigarettes at points of sale (tills) and the sale of cigarettes through vending machines will be prohibited. 

Electronic nicotine and non-nicotine delivery systems will also be regulated through the Bill. “Through implementing the cost-effective, proven measures in the Bill, which apply to both tobacco products and e-cigarettes, we can help free our youth from addiction to nicotine,” says Zulu.

For those who already smoke or use e-cigarettes, Nyatsanza recommends accessing support to quit. “If you need to free yourself from tobacco and nicotine addiction, Freedom Day is a great time to start!” says Nyatsanza. “Research shows if you can make it to 28 days without smoking, you’re five times more likely to quit for good.” NCAS offers  a 30-day support system delivered through WhatsApp 072 766  4812. Quitters can also call the National Quitline on 011 720 3145, which is printed on every cigarette package.

 
Lorraine Govender, National Manager of Health Promotion for the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), says the new Bill will help free South Africa from the crippling impact of non-communicable diseases, including cancer. We have long campaigned for better measures that can free South Africa from the crippling impact of non-communicable diseases, which are currently responsible for the deaths of 50,9% of South Africans. Tobacco use is a major risk factor and is currently estimated to cost South Africa R42-billion per year in treating illnesses and loss of productivity. We must take action to free our economy from further strain and we look forward to stronger legislation that will better protect our rights to freedom and health.”

 
“Show your support for a tobacco-free and nicotine-free South Africa this Freedom Day by visiting www.protectournext.co.za and pledging your support for the Bill,” says Nyatsanza. “Let’s pass the Bill in 2023.”


About Protect our Next

Health organisations forming part of the #protectournext partnership include the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC), the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HSFSA) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). Together, these organisations are steadfast in driving awareness of the dangers of tobacco and e-cigarettes, while campaigning for the Control of Tobacco and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill to be passed. 
www.protectournext.co.za
@protectournext

PROTECT OUR NEXT PRESS KIT

About the Bill:

The Tobacco Control Bill requires that any enclosed public area is 100% smoke-free, and will make certain outdoor public places smoke-free too, providing protection for many South Africans who are often involuntarily exposed to second-hand smoke. It removes the requirement to provide for smoking areas in all enclosed public places, workplaces and on public conveyances and applies the 100% smoking ban to common areas of multi-unit residences. It further prohibits smoking and the use of electronic cigarettes in private dwellings used for commercial child care or education, and in cars carrying children under 18, rather than under 12.

The Bill introduces uniform plain packaging for all brands and pictorial warnings on all packages. Advertising of tobacco products, heated tobacco and electronic cigarettes at points of sale (tills) and the sale of cigarettes through vending machines will be prohibited. 

AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEW:

Prof. Lekan Ayo-Yusuf, Director of the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) and the Head of the School of Health Systems and Public Health at the University of Pretoria

Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director, NCAS

Dr Catherine Egbe, Specialist Scientist: Alcohol, Tobacco and other Drug Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council

Sanele Zulu, Convenor: South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum

Zanele Mthembu, Public Health Policy and Development Consultant and Convenor: Protect Our Next

Lorraine Govender, National Manager, Health Promotion, CANSA

MEDIA CONTACT:

Tamaryn Brown

Connect Media for CART Agency

084 3510560 / tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za

This World Tuberculosis (TB) Day, health organisations forming part of the Protect our Next movement in South Africa are calling for the urgent implementation of a stronger tobacco control policy to create an enabling environment for those who want to quit smoking, a major risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). Smoking increases the risk of contracting TB, increases the risk of recurrent TB and impairs the response to treatment of the disease, says Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking.

World TB Day is observed annually on 24 March to raise awareness about TB and efforts to end the global epidemic, marking the day in 1882 when the bacterium causing TB was discovered. The theme of World TB Day 2023 – Yes! We can end TB! – aims to inspire hope and encourage high-level leadership, increased investments, faster uptake of new WHO recommendations, adoption of innovations, accelerated action and multisectoral collaboration to combat the TB epidemic. 

The WHO has called for the integration of tobacco control in country responses to the HIV and TB twin epidemics.  Implementing the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC), as the Control of Tobacco and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill seeks to do; will help fight the TB epidemic that South Africa faces.  Partner organisations in the Protect our Next initiative, including the National Council of Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF) are hopeful that the Bill, now in parliament,  will be passed in 2023.

In South Africa, 29.4% of people use tobacco, according to the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS-SA) results released last year. “A comprehensive response to the TB epidemic must include a strategy to reduce tobacco use,” says Nyatsanza. “Stronger tobacco control policy will create a more quit-friendly environment, helping more people to stop smoking.”

Dr Nyatsanza provides the following insights on smoking and tuberculosis in South Africa:

“For South Africa, a country that is disproportionately affected by TB, the passing of the Tobacco Control Bill is urgent. A decrease in tobacco use would improve TB health outcomes and this will also free much-needed funds for TB and other public health priorities,” Nyatsanza concludes.

For help to stop smoking, call the National Council Against Smoking Quitline at 011 720 3145 or send an SMS/WhatsApp message to 072 7664812. www.againstsmoking.co.za


@protectournext
www.protectournext.co.za

RESOURCES:

Call the National Council Against Smoking – Quitline at 011 720 3145 for tips to help you stop smoking.  

CANSA runs an online programme which also provides support and information for smokers who would like to stop smoking on http://www.ekickbutt.org.za/.

Available for interview:

Sharon Nyatsanza (Phd), Deputy Director, NCAS
Prof. Lekan Ayo-Yusuf, Director of the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) and the Head of the School of Health Systems and Public Health at the University of Pretoria

Dr Catherine Egbe, Specialist Scientist: Alcohol, Tobacco and other Drug Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council

Sanele Zulu, Convenor: South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum

Zanele Mthembu, Public Health Policy and Development Consultant

Lorraine Govender, National Manager, Health Promotion, CANSA

Media Contact:

Tamaryn Brown

Connect Media for CART agency

tamaryn@cart.agency

With the Covid-19 pandemic further highlighting the critical importance of quitting tobacco, the World Health Organisation (WHO) and other health organisations continue to encourage countries to assist tobacco users to quit. Following on from 2021 ‘Commit to quit’ campaigns, the WHO has announced the 2022 global campaign for World No Tobacco Day – “Tobacco: Threat to our environment.”  The campaign aims to raise awareness of the environmental impact of tobacco – from cultivation, to production, distribution and waste. It gives tobacco users yet another reason to quit.  

In continued support of quit initiatives into 2022, the National Department of Health (DOH) is working closely with the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) and leading NGOs active in South Africa to communicate the importance of quitting smoking and the resources available to help people quit through a new campaign titled ‘Sibo Manqoba!’.

“South Africans embrace winning and being winners. Sibo Manqoba means ‘we are winners’. Through the new ‘Sibo Manqoba’ campaign, we’re calling on South Africans to conquer tobacco and win the battle against this debilitating addiction by committing to quit now.  Quitters are winners!” says Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking,  

The DOH will continue promoting a ‘quit attitude’ through sharing information, quitting resources and support as well as partnering with local NGOs and community organisations to roll out an educational programme in schools. The programme kicks off with a tobacco education mural competition, schools pledge and education days delivered in partnership with the Department of Environmental Health (DoEH) and Protect our Next (@protectournext) organisations– the NCAS, the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the SA Medical Research Council (SAMRC) the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HFSA) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF).

“Tobacco use is still unacceptably high in South Africa, with 1 in 5 adults smoking. More than 80% of smokers smoked their first cigarette in their teens, and most smokers wish they had never started,” says Nyatsanza. “We believe educated communities are vitally important in the fight against tobacco. The new Tobacco Control Bill will better protect our communities, but we cannot wait for that to be passed before doing all we can to protect ourselves and our environment. Communities should better understand the risks and send a clear message that they will be tobacco-free.” 

Quitting smoking: the tools

For smokers, the message is clear, quit to protect your health, the health of those around you and our environment. “Nicotine is highly addictive, leading those trying to quit smoking down a path of physical and psychological hardship. Tobacco dependency is a chronic medical condition that may need repeated interventions. Kicking the habit, though not easy, is not impossible either. Through determination, willpower and some practical strategies, it can be done.”

The WHO recommends that smokers take immediate steps to quit by using proven methods such as quit lines and nicotine replacement therapies such as gum and patches, which are designed to help smokers quit tobacco.

Within 20 minutes of quitting, elevated heart rate and blood pressure drop. After 12 hours, the carbon monoxide level in the bloodstream drops to normal. Within 2-12 weeks, circulation improves and lung function increases. After 1-9 months, coughing and shortness of breath decrease.

Giving up smoking is beneficial for smokers across all age groups, even those suffering from smoking-related health problems. You can gain up to ten years of life expectancy by quitting. 

Quitting after the onset of a life-threatening disease, versus continuing smoking, also has rapid benefits. People who quit smoking after having a heart attack reduce their chances of having another heart attack by 50%.

Giving up smoking decreases the high risk of many diseases related to second-hand smoke in children, such as respiratory diseases and ear infections. Giving up smoking also reduces the risk of impotence, experiencing difficulty getting pregnant, premature births, low birth weight babies and miscarriage.

Top ten quit tips:

1.     Set a quit date, within 2 weeks, to give up smoking completely. Tell family, friends and co-workers about this quit date and seek their understanding and support.

2.     Have a plan! Anticipate challenges to the upcoming quit attempt and be prepared to address them.

3.     Remove all tobacco products and smoking paraphernalia from your environment. Make your home smoke free.

4.     Drink a lot of liquids, especially water. Try herbal teas or fruit juices. Limit coffee, soft drinks and alcohol as they can increase your urge to smoke.

5.     Avoid sweet and fatty foods. Try low calorie foods for snacking, such as carrots and other vegetables, sugarless gum, air popped popcorn or low-fat cottage cheese. Do not skip meals.

6.     Exercise regularly and moderately. Regular exercise helps. Joining an exercise group provides a healthy activity and a new routine.

7.     Get more sleep. Try to go to sleep early and get more rest.

8.     Take deep breaths. Distract yourself. When cravings hit, do something else immediately, such as talking to someone, getting busy with a task, or taking deep breaths. Watching a movie or listening to relaxing music can help. 

9.     Know your smoking triggers and change your habits. Take a different route to work, eat breakfast in a different place, or get up from the table immediately after eating.

10.   Use nicotine replacement therapy and other effective pharmacological products in consultation with a doctor.

Resources:

·For help to stop smoking, smokers can reach out to the National Council Against Smoking QUITLINE: 011 720 3145 or WhatsApp 072 766 4812

·The Cancer Association of South Africa runs eKick Butt, a unique online smoking cessation programme https://www.ekickbutt.org.za/


Other centres that may assist include:

·Lifeline provides counselling on a variety of issues and may be contacted @ 0800-12-322, the gender violence line is:  08000-150-150 and the AIDS helpline is: 0800-012-322.

·If you are struggling with breaking the addiction cycle, reach out to the South African National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (SANCA) via WhatsApp on 076 535 1701 or call them on 011 892 3829.

·For help on how to manage stress and anxiety, call the South African Depression and Anxiety Support Group who can be contacted on 0800 21 22 23 and 0800 70 80 90. 
 

Available for comment:

Lynn Moeng, National Department of Health: Director

Lorato Mahura, National Department of Health: Health Promotion

Sharon Nyatsanza, PhD, Deputy Director, National Council Against Smoking

Tel: 011 725 1514 / 079 666 1356

www.againstsmoking.co.za

Media contact:

Tamaryn Brown

Connect Media for CART Agency

Tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za

Tel: 084 3510560

Comments from Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director, National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) 

The National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) welcomes the fourth WHO global tobacco trends report published on Tuesday, which shows that smoking rates are falling globally. In the past 20 years global smoking rates have dropped from 32% to 22%. This is good news for public health, and it is a confirmation that strong tobacco control policies are effective. It also commendable that the African Region has the highest proportion of countries on track for a 30% reduction in smoking rates by 2025 (53% of countries). But, the report also makes it clear that the gains are not equal, but are closely linked to progress and efforts made by individual countries to end the tobacco epidemic. South Africa is not among the 25 Afro region countries on track to meet the reduction target of 30% by 2025.

 If South Africa continues with business as usual, in particular the slow rate of implementation of strong tobacco control policies, the WHO estimates that South Africa will see a small decrease of 6% in smoking rates. This is significantly lower than other African countries like Uganda and Kenya, which will see a 54% and 30% drop in smoking rates respectively. Both of these countries have put in place stronger tobacco control laws. For instance, they have 100% smoke-free public places, which better protects non-smokers from harmful second-hand smoke. Kenya and Uganda also require graphic health warnings on tobacco products, which have been proven to be more effective in preventing children from starting to smoke and in encouraging smokers to quit.

South Africa, as one of the 182 members of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), acknowledges that the solution to the tobacco problem lies in implementing strong tobacco control policies as recommended under the FCTC. So we know the solutions, the challenge lies in implementing these solutions with speed. Over three years have passed since the Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill (Tobacco Control Bill) was published, and it still has not been passed as law. Every day of delay results in more premature deaths and disability from tobacco. 

Reducing tobacco use is not only a health priority, but also an economic, sustainable development, and human rights issue. High smoking rates threaten sustainable development, exacerbate poverty and burden the health system. To see a significant fall in smoking rates and to truly end the damage caused by tobacco use, South Africa needs to accelerate its tobacco control efforts, the first being to pass the Tobacco Control Bill into law.

[ENDS]

Health organisations forming part of the #protectournext partnership include the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HSFSA) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). Together, these organisations are steadfast in driving awareness of the dangers of tobacco and e-cigarettes, while campaigning for the Control of Tobacco and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill to be passed. 
www.protectournext.co.za
@protectournext

Media Contact:
Tamaryn Brown
Tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za / Tamaryn@cart.agency
084 3510560

For further information, contact

Dr Sharon Nyatsanza (Ph.D.)

Deputy Director – National Council Against Smoking

Contact: 079 666 1356 / 011 725 1514

sharon@againstsmoking.org.za  

The National Council Against Smoking is a leading not-for-profit organisation working to promote public health by encouraging a tobacco-free society.
 

Press kit with photos: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/1gm16476cjq31ts/AAArW8vViqkhTtXbLxe_1pqqa?dl=0

Here’s your chance to ask all your questions live as we chat with the wonderful oncologist Dr Sithembile Ngidi to wrap up Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  Learn about reducing your risk of cancer, how and why smoking causes cancer, signs to watch out for and how to screen for cancer.  Lorraine Govender from CANSA will join the chat to share information on where to go for help and support, and to discuss how the new Tobacco Control Bill will better protect our health. 

See you on Sunday 31st October at 3pm on Facebook Live @protectournext. 

Click here for more and please share with your networks.    

What is Cancer?

Cancer refers to diseases in which abnormal cells divide out of control and are able to invade other tissues. Cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph systems, which help the body get rid of toxins. 

There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for the organ or type of cell in which they start—for example, lung cancer begins in the lung and laryngeal cancer begins in the larynx (voice box).

Symptoms can include: 

How is smoking related to cancer?

Smoking can cause cancer and then block your body from fighting it: 

Poisons in cigarette smoke can weaken the body’s immune system, making it harder to kill cancer cells. When this happens, cancer cells keep growing without being stopped.

Poisons in tobacco smoke can damage or change a cell’s DNA. DNA is the cell’s “instruction manual” that controls a cell’s normal growth and function. When DNA is damaged, a cell can begin growing out of control and create a cancer tumour.

Doctors have known for years that smoking causes most lung cancers. It’s still true today, when nearly 9 out of 10 lung cancers deaths are caused by smoking cigarettes or secondhand smoke exposure. In fact, smokers have a greater risk for lung cancer today than they did in 1964, even though they smoke fewer cigarettes. One reason may be changes in how cigarettes are made and what chemicals they contain. 

Treatments are getting better, but lung cancer still kills more men and women than any other type of cancer. 

Second-hand smoke is the combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke breathed out by someone smoking. 

Smoking can cause cancer almost anywhere in your body: 

• Bladder 

• Blood (acute myeloid leukaemia) 

• Cervix 

• Colon and rectum (colorectal) 

• Oesophagus 

• Kidney and ureter 

• Larynx 

• Liver 

• Oropharynx (includes parts of the throat, tongue, soft palate, and the tonsils) 

• Pancreas 

• Stomach 

• Trachea, bronchus, and lung

Men with prostate cancer who smoke may be more likely to die from prostate cancer than nonsmokers. 

Smokeless tobacco, such as chewing tobacco, also causes cancer, including cancers of the: 

How can smoking-related cancers be prevented?


The most important thing you can do to prevent smoking-related cancer is not to smoke cigarettes, or to quit if you do. It is also important to avoid secondhand smoke.

Quitting smoking lowers the risk for 12 types of cancer: cancers of the lung, larynx, oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, pancreas, bladder, stomach, colon and rectum, liver, cervix, kidney, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). 

Within 5-10 years of quitting, your chance of getting cancer of the mouth, throat, or voice box drops by half. 

Within 10 years of quitting, your chance of getting cancer of the bladder, esophagus, or kidney decreases. 

Within 10-15 years after you quit smoking, your risk of lung cancer drops by half. 

Within 20 years after you quit smoking, your risk of getting cancer of the mouth, throat, voice box, or pancreas drops to close of that of someone who does not smoke. Also, the risk of cervical cancer drops by about half. 

This Saturday, 30 October, the Mamelodi community will march from Stanza Bopape Sports Complex to Matimba Library Hall as they pledge to #Switchofftobacco in Mams. Local community leaders, school principals and teams from the Department of Environmental Health (DoEH) are joining forces with Protect our Next, a partnership of South Africa’s health organisations, to collect tobacco litter en route, which local learners will use to create larger than life tobacco education murals at their schools. 

The march will be followed by an event featuring community members, school principals, Protect our Next ambassadors, youth advocacy groups Youth with Passion, Ikamva Youth and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF), Pastor Pieter from the Royal Eagles Ministry at Silverton.  Successful quitter Nicholas Mokena will share his quit story. The programme incorporates dance, music and theatre featuring local company 6N9 Production. 

The community march is part of a new initiative to #SwitchoffTobacco in Mamelodi activating community media, local schools, churches, taxi ranks, malls, traders and community hotspots with an engaging edutainment programme that encourages the whole community to pledge to be tobacco free. 

“Active, educated communities are vitally important in the fight against tobacco. Everyone can help by educating themselves and others about the risks,” says Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking. “It’s time to take back our health from big tobacco bullies.”


Launched during Schools Health Week, the #SwitchoffTobacco initiative has seen a dynamic team of Protect our Next ambassadors educating hundreds of learners at Thuto Bothlale Secondary School and Nwavangani Primary School about the dangers of tobacco and e-cigarettes, highlighting how the new Tobacco Control Bill will better protect communities.  The schools pledged to remain smoke-free.

“Tobacco use is still too high in South Africa. About 1 in 5 adults smoke, and this has a major impact on the health of communities and strains our health system,” says Nyatsanza. “More than 80% of smokers smoked their first cigarette in their teens, and most smokers wish they had never started. It’s clear that tobacco companies are active in the townships, targeting these markets. Communities like Mamelodi, a buzzing hotspot with an influx of people, need to protect themselves from tobacco industry manipulation and send a clear message that they will be tobacco-free. It’s up to communities to get involved and take action.”

Nyatsanza says passing the proposed Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Services Bill into law is a vital part of better protecting communities. “The new Bill requires that any indoor public place is 100% smoke-free, and will make certain outdoor public places smoke-free too. It will further ban smoking in private dwellings used for commercial child care and educational activities, and in cars carrying children under 18. Cigarette advertising at tills and the sale of cigarette via vending machines, which is a channel for young people to access cigarettes would also be prohibited if this bill is passed into law.”

Importantly, the new Bill seeks to regulate e-cigarettes or vape products. “Our current legislation predates e-cigarettes and manufacturers have used the legislative vacuum to promote these devices and appeal to youth – including marketing e-liquids which come in a number of flavours to make them more appealing to young people,” says Dr. Catherine Egbe of the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) “We must close the legislative gap and prevent a new generation from becoming addicted to nicotine.”

The Protect our Next team aims to roll out similar education and awareness initiatives in other communities across South Africa. The successful #protectournext schools education programme has also taken place in schools in Alexandra, Midrand and Ivory Park. Educators and community leaders welcomed the initiative, saying that children are both exposed to and experimenting with tobacco at a young age. “Many of our learners have parents and relatives who smoke. These education initiatives really help the children to understand the dangers and to better protect themselves, and we also hope they will take the message home,” says Vice Principal Patrick Ndange of Emfundisweni Primary School. 

Protect our Next is a partnership between South Africa’s leading health organisations, including the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the SA Medical Research Council (SAMRC) the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HFSA) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). Together, the organisations are united in educating communities about tobacco and campaigning for the new Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Services Bill to be passed to better protect the health of the nation. 

HOW YOU CAN PROTECT YOUR COMMUNITY FROM THE TOBACCO EPIDEMIC:

#protectournext

(ENDS)

www.protectournext.co.za

Facebook and Twitter:@protectournext

Website: www.protectournext.co.za

MARCH AND EVENT PROGRAMME:

ProtectOurNext Mamelodi Community – October 2021 
#SwitchOnMams to #SwitchOffTobacco

March Details 
Date of March:             Sat,30 October 2021

Gather Time:               09:00

March Start Time:        09:30

Starting Point:             Stanza Bopape Sports Complex

End Point:                   Matimba Library Hall

Event Programme: 10:30 – 12:00

– Opening with National Anthem 

– Welcome by the PON Brand Ambassador Team

– Tobacco vs The Health of our Community: Samuel Ntshegang (PON Ambassador) and Sanele Zulu (SATFYF)

– Community Leader Address: Pastor Pieter

– Community Member Address: Nicholas Mokoena – A Quit Story

– Industrial Theatre – PON Brand Ambassador Team

– Community School Principal

– Youth With Passion

– Industrial Theatre – PON Brand Ambassador Team

– Community Participation: Dance

– Thank you Mams!

Media Interviews: 12:00 – 13:30

Available for interview:

Media contact:

On-site:
Nirvana Kishoon
CART Agency

nirvana@cart.agency
+27 (0) 82 823 3167

Off-site:

Tamaryn Brown

Connect Media for CART agency

tamaryn@cart.agency

tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za

+ 27 (0) 84 3510560