This Freedom Day advocates of tobacco control are highlighting the power of the law to protect our rights to freedom and health, while calling for the passing of new legislation to free South Africa from addiction and other harms associated with the use of tobacco and related products including e-cigarettes.  “As we commemorate our first democratic elections, let’s celebrate the power of good governance and law to change lives for the better and protect our future.  We believe in creating a tobacco-free and nicotine-free South Africa.  The Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Control Bill, currently in parliament, will help us do that,” says Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS).


NCAS and other health organisations united under the Protect our Next initiative are hopeful the Bill can become law in 2023.  “Measures in the new Bill close loopholes and are set to reduce tobacco use,  exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke as well as the initiation of tobacco use by young people. It brings South Africa’s domestic legislation closer to full implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), a global standard captured as sustainable development Goal (SDG) target 3.a,” says Nyatsanza.

The first Global Adult Tobacco Survey conducted in South Africa (GATS-SA) conducted by the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) in 2021 shows high levels of tobacco use (29.4%) and second-hand smoke exposure in South Africa.  The research further shows strong public support for regulations, with nine out of ten adults supporting a ban on smoking in indoor workplaces and public places. Survey lead investigator and specialist scientist within the SAMRC’s Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Research Unit, Dr Catherine Egbe says, “A sick nation is a poor nation. Our communities want freedom from tobacco and the damage it causes to our health, our environment and our economy. The Bill includes carefully designed measures to achieve this and we need it to be urgently passed into law so we can move towards a tobacco-free, healthy nation.”

The Bill prohibits smoking and the use of e-cigarettes in enclosed public areas, such as restaurants, and will make certain outdoor public places 100% smoke-free too, ensuring South Africans are free from exposure to second-hand smoke. It will remove smoking areas on public conveyances and apply the 100% smoking ban to common areas of multi-unit residences. It further prohibits smoking and the use of electronic cigarettes in private dwellings used for commercial child care or education, and in cars carrying children under 18, rather than under 12 as is currently the case.

“Freedom from tobacco use means so many things – freedom to breathe, to be healthy, to live longer lives.  It frees our loved ones and communities from toxic second-hand smoke. It also gives hungry communities the freedom to spend more money on food, rather than tobacco,” says Sanele Zulu, Convenor of the South African Tobacco-Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). “Our young people need to make the right choices, but they also deserve better protection from the targeted marketing of tobacco and e-cigarette companies. The new Bill provides this protection.”

The Bill introduces uniform plain packaging for all brands and pictorial warnings on all packages.  Advertising of tobacco products, heated tobacco and electronic cigarettes at points of sale (tills) and the sale of cigarettes through vending machines will be prohibited. 

Electronic nicotine and non-nicotine delivery systems will also be regulated through the Bill. “Through implementing the cost-effective, proven measures in the Bill, which apply to both tobacco products and e-cigarettes, we can help free our youth from addiction to nicotine,” says Zulu.

For those who already smoke or use e-cigarettes, Nyatsanza recommends accessing support to quit. “If you need to free yourself from tobacco and nicotine addiction, Freedom Day is a great time to start!” says Nyatsanza. “Research shows if you can make it to 28 days without smoking, you’re five times more likely to quit for good.” NCAS offers  a 30-day support system delivered through WhatsApp 072 766  4812. Quitters can also call the National Quitline on 011 720 3145, which is printed on every cigarette package.

 
Lorraine Govender, National Manager of Health Promotion for the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), says the new Bill will help free South Africa from the crippling impact of non-communicable diseases, including cancer. We have long campaigned for better measures that can free South Africa from the crippling impact of non-communicable diseases, which are currently responsible for the deaths of 50,9% of South Africans. Tobacco use is a major risk factor and is currently estimated to cost South Africa R42-billion per year in treating illnesses and loss of productivity. We must take action to free our economy from further strain and we look forward to stronger legislation that will better protect our rights to freedom and health.”

 
“Show your support for a tobacco-free and nicotine-free South Africa this Freedom Day by visiting www.protectournext.co.za and pledging your support for the Bill,” says Nyatsanza. “Let’s pass the Bill in 2023.”


About Protect our Next

Health organisations forming part of the #protectournext partnership include the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC), the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HSFSA) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). Together, these organisations are steadfast in driving awareness of the dangers of tobacco and e-cigarettes, while campaigning for the Control of Tobacco and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill to be passed. 
www.protectournext.co.za
@protectournext

PROTECT OUR NEXT PRESS KIT

About the Bill:

The Tobacco Control Bill requires that any enclosed public area is 100% smoke-free, and will make certain outdoor public places smoke-free too, providing protection for many South Africans who are often involuntarily exposed to second-hand smoke. It removes the requirement to provide for smoking areas in all enclosed public places, workplaces and on public conveyances and applies the 100% smoking ban to common areas of multi-unit residences. It further prohibits smoking and the use of electronic cigarettes in private dwellings used for commercial child care or education, and in cars carrying children under 18, rather than under 12.

The Bill introduces uniform plain packaging for all brands and pictorial warnings on all packages. Advertising of tobacco products, heated tobacco and electronic cigarettes at points of sale (tills) and the sale of cigarettes through vending machines will be prohibited. 

AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEW:

Prof. Lekan Ayo-Yusuf, Director of the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) and the Head of the School of Health Systems and Public Health at the University of Pretoria

Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director, NCAS

Dr Catherine Egbe, Specialist Scientist: Alcohol, Tobacco and other Drug Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council

Sanele Zulu, Convenor: South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum

Zanele Mthembu, Public Health Policy and Development Consultant and Convenor: Protect Our Next

Lorraine Govender, National Manager, Health Promotion, CANSA

MEDIA CONTACT:

Tamaryn Brown

Connect Media for CART Agency

084 3510560 / tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za

This World Tuberculosis (TB) Day, health organisations forming part of the Protect our Next movement in South Africa are calling for the urgent implementation of a stronger tobacco control policy to create an enabling environment for those who want to quit smoking, a major risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). Smoking increases the risk of contracting TB, increases the risk of recurrent TB and impairs the response to treatment of the disease, says Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking.

World TB Day is observed annually on 24 March to raise awareness about TB and efforts to end the global epidemic, marking the day in 1882 when the bacterium causing TB was discovered. The theme of World TB Day 2023 – Yes! We can end TB! – aims to inspire hope and encourage high-level leadership, increased investments, faster uptake of new WHO recommendations, adoption of innovations, accelerated action and multisectoral collaboration to combat the TB epidemic. 

The WHO has called for the integration of tobacco control in country responses to the HIV and TB twin epidemics.  Implementing the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC), as the Control of Tobacco and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill seeks to do; will help fight the TB epidemic that South Africa faces.  Partner organisations in the Protect our Next initiative, including the National Council of Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF) are hopeful that the Bill, now in parliament,  will be passed in 2023.

In South Africa, 29.4% of people use tobacco, according to the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS-SA) results released last year. “A comprehensive response to the TB epidemic must include a strategy to reduce tobacco use,” says Nyatsanza. “Stronger tobacco control policy will create a more quit-friendly environment, helping more people to stop smoking.”

Dr Nyatsanza provides the following insights on smoking and tuberculosis in South Africa:

“For South Africa, a country that is disproportionately affected by TB, the passing of the Tobacco Control Bill is urgent. A decrease in tobacco use would improve TB health outcomes and this will also free much-needed funds for TB and other public health priorities,” Nyatsanza concludes.

For help to stop smoking, call the National Council Against Smoking Quitline at 011 720 3145 or send an SMS/WhatsApp message to 072 7664812. www.againstsmoking.co.za


@protectournext
www.protectournext.co.za

RESOURCES:

Call the National Council Against Smoking – Quitline at 011 720 3145 for tips to help you stop smoking.  

CANSA runs an online programme which also provides support and information for smokers who would like to stop smoking on http://www.ekickbutt.org.za/.

Available for interview:

Sharon Nyatsanza (Phd), Deputy Director, NCAS
Prof. Lekan Ayo-Yusuf, Director of the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) and the Head of the School of Health Systems and Public Health at the University of Pretoria

Dr Catherine Egbe, Specialist Scientist: Alcohol, Tobacco and other Drug Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council

Sanele Zulu, Convenor: South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum

Zanele Mthembu, Public Health Policy and Development Consultant

Lorraine Govender, National Manager, Health Promotion, CANSA

Media Contact:

Tamaryn Brown

Connect Media for CART agency

tamaryn@cart.agency

Comments from Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director, National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) 

The National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) welcomes the fourth WHO global tobacco trends report published on Tuesday, which shows that smoking rates are falling globally. In the past 20 years global smoking rates have dropped from 32% to 22%. This is good news for public health, and it is a confirmation that strong tobacco control policies are effective. It also commendable that the African Region has the highest proportion of countries on track for a 30% reduction in smoking rates by 2025 (53% of countries). But, the report also makes it clear that the gains are not equal, but are closely linked to progress and efforts made by individual countries to end the tobacco epidemic. South Africa is not among the 25 Afro region countries on track to meet the reduction target of 30% by 2025.

 If South Africa continues with business as usual, in particular the slow rate of implementation of strong tobacco control policies, the WHO estimates that South Africa will see a small decrease of 6% in smoking rates. This is significantly lower than other African countries like Uganda and Kenya, which will see a 54% and 30% drop in smoking rates respectively. Both of these countries have put in place stronger tobacco control laws. For instance, they have 100% smoke-free public places, which better protects non-smokers from harmful second-hand smoke. Kenya and Uganda also require graphic health warnings on tobacco products, which have been proven to be more effective in preventing children from starting to smoke and in encouraging smokers to quit.

South Africa, as one of the 182 members of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), acknowledges that the solution to the tobacco problem lies in implementing strong tobacco control policies as recommended under the FCTC. So we know the solutions, the challenge lies in implementing these solutions with speed. Over three years have passed since the Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill (Tobacco Control Bill) was published, and it still has not been passed as law. Every day of delay results in more premature deaths and disability from tobacco. 

Reducing tobacco use is not only a health priority, but also an economic, sustainable development, and human rights issue. High smoking rates threaten sustainable development, exacerbate poverty and burden the health system. To see a significant fall in smoking rates and to truly end the damage caused by tobacco use, South Africa needs to accelerate its tobacco control efforts, the first being to pass the Tobacco Control Bill into law.

[ENDS]

Health organisations forming part of the #protectournext partnership include the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HSFSA) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). Together, these organisations are steadfast in driving awareness of the dangers of tobacco and e-cigarettes, while campaigning for the Control of Tobacco and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill to be passed. 
www.protectournext.co.za
@protectournext

Media Contact:
Tamaryn Brown
Tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za / Tamaryn@cart.agency
084 3510560

For further information, contact

Dr Sharon Nyatsanza (Ph.D.)

Deputy Director – National Council Against Smoking

Contact: 079 666 1356 / 011 725 1514

sharon@againstsmoking.org.za  

The National Council Against Smoking is a leading not-for-profit organisation working to promote public health by encouraging a tobacco-free society.
 

Press kit with photos: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/1gm16476cjq31ts/AAArW8vViqkhTtXbLxe_1pqqa?dl=0

This Saturday, 30 October, the Mamelodi community will march from Stanza Bopape Sports Complex to Matimba Library Hall as they pledge to #Switchofftobacco in Mams. Local community leaders, school principals and teams from the Department of Environmental Health (DoEH) are joining forces with Protect our Next, a partnership of South Africa’s health organisations, to collect tobacco litter en route, which local learners will use to create larger than life tobacco education murals at their schools. 

The march will be followed by an event featuring community members, school principals, Protect our Next ambassadors, youth advocacy groups Youth with Passion, Ikamva Youth and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF), Pastor Pieter from the Royal Eagles Ministry at Silverton.  Successful quitter Nicholas Mokena will share his quit story. The programme incorporates dance, music and theatre featuring local company 6N9 Production. 

The community march is part of a new initiative to #SwitchoffTobacco in Mamelodi activating community media, local schools, churches, taxi ranks, malls, traders and community hotspots with an engaging edutainment programme that encourages the whole community to pledge to be tobacco free. 

“Active, educated communities are vitally important in the fight against tobacco. Everyone can help by educating themselves and others about the risks,” says Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking. “It’s time to take back our health from big tobacco bullies.”


Launched during Schools Health Week, the #SwitchoffTobacco initiative has seen a dynamic team of Protect our Next ambassadors educating hundreds of learners at Thuto Bothlale Secondary School and Nwavangani Primary School about the dangers of tobacco and e-cigarettes, highlighting how the new Tobacco Control Bill will better protect communities.  The schools pledged to remain smoke-free.

“Tobacco use is still too high in South Africa. About 1 in 5 adults smoke, and this has a major impact on the health of communities and strains our health system,” says Nyatsanza. “More than 80% of smokers smoked their first cigarette in their teens, and most smokers wish they had never started. It’s clear that tobacco companies are active in the townships, targeting these markets. Communities like Mamelodi, a buzzing hotspot with an influx of people, need to protect themselves from tobacco industry manipulation and send a clear message that they will be tobacco-free. It’s up to communities to get involved and take action.”

Nyatsanza says passing the proposed Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Services Bill into law is a vital part of better protecting communities. “The new Bill requires that any indoor public place is 100% smoke-free, and will make certain outdoor public places smoke-free too. It will further ban smoking in private dwellings used for commercial child care and educational activities, and in cars carrying children under 18. Cigarette advertising at tills and the sale of cigarette via vending machines, which is a channel for young people to access cigarettes would also be prohibited if this bill is passed into law.”

Importantly, the new Bill seeks to regulate e-cigarettes or vape products. “Our current legislation predates e-cigarettes and manufacturers have used the legislative vacuum to promote these devices and appeal to youth – including marketing e-liquids which come in a number of flavours to make them more appealing to young people,” says Dr. Catherine Egbe of the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) “We must close the legislative gap and prevent a new generation from becoming addicted to nicotine.”

The Protect our Next team aims to roll out similar education and awareness initiatives in other communities across South Africa. The successful #protectournext schools education programme has also taken place in schools in Alexandra, Midrand and Ivory Park. Educators and community leaders welcomed the initiative, saying that children are both exposed to and experimenting with tobacco at a young age. “Many of our learners have parents and relatives who smoke. These education initiatives really help the children to understand the dangers and to better protect themselves, and we also hope they will take the message home,” says Vice Principal Patrick Ndange of Emfundisweni Primary School. 

Protect our Next is a partnership between South Africa’s leading health organisations, including the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the SA Medical Research Council (SAMRC) the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HFSA) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). Together, the organisations are united in educating communities about tobacco and campaigning for the new Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Services Bill to be passed to better protect the health of the nation. 

HOW YOU CAN PROTECT YOUR COMMUNITY FROM THE TOBACCO EPIDEMIC:

#protectournext

(ENDS)

www.protectournext.co.za

Facebook and Twitter:@protectournext

Website: www.protectournext.co.za

MARCH AND EVENT PROGRAMME:

ProtectOurNext Mamelodi Community – October 2021 
#SwitchOnMams to #SwitchOffTobacco

March Details 
Date of March:             Sat,30 October 2021

Gather Time:               09:00

March Start Time:        09:30

Starting Point:             Stanza Bopape Sports Complex

End Point:                   Matimba Library Hall

Event Programme: 10:30 – 12:00

– Opening with National Anthem 

– Welcome by the PON Brand Ambassador Team

– Tobacco vs The Health of our Community: Samuel Ntshegang (PON Ambassador) and Sanele Zulu (SATFYF)

– Community Leader Address: Pastor Pieter

– Community Member Address: Nicholas Mokoena – A Quit Story

– Industrial Theatre – PON Brand Ambassador Team

– Community School Principal

– Youth With Passion

– Industrial Theatre – PON Brand Ambassador Team

– Community Participation: Dance

– Thank you Mams!

Media Interviews: 12:00 – 13:30

Available for interview:

Media contact:

On-site:
Nirvana Kishoon
CART Agency

nirvana@cart.agency
+27 (0) 82 823 3167

Off-site:

Tamaryn Brown

Connect Media for CART agency

tamaryn@cart.agency

tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za

+ 27 (0) 84 3510560

Dr Sharon Nyatsanza of the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS) says a respiratory pandemic is an opportune time for an increased focus on tobacco control, especially as new evidence shows a strong link between smoking and increased risks of severe COVID-19. According to UK Biobank research published in a leading respiratory journal, Thoraxsmoking increases the chances of developing severe COVID-19 symptoms by 80% and increases the risk of death by 511%, for smokers who smoke 20 or more cigarettes a day. 

The new study found that compared with those who had never smoked, current smokers were 80% more likely to be admitted to hospital. It found that heavy smoking significantly increased chances of dying from COVID-19 complications, by up to 511% for those who smoked 20 or more cigarettes a day – compared to non-smokers. The UK study drew on primary care records, COVID-19 test results, hospital admissions data and death certificates to look for associations between smoking and COVID-19 infection severity from January to August 2020 in over 400 000 participants of the UK Biobank. 

“This study strengthens the evidence base and establishes a causal link between smoking and serious COVID-19 complications,” says Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking. “It also supports the Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (Cogta) Minister’s case, who has since been granted leave to appeal the Western Cape Judgement over the temporary ban on tobacco sales. A key justification raised by government, was that tobacco use was linked to worse Covid-19 outcomes and that the ban was important in easing the burden on the health system.”

Nyatsanza highlights the importance of passing South Africa’s new Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill as soon as possible, particularly with reports from the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) indicating that the death toll from Covid-19 is up to three times more than reported, making South Africa one of the worst affected countries in the world.  “We need urgent action to pass this updated and comprehensive set of measures to better protect our nation’s health and reduce the burden of tobacco-related disease on our health system, now and beyond the pandemic.”

Nyatsanza says that encouraging people to quit smoking and reducing smoking prevalence should be high on the list of preventive steps, as it keeps people out of hospital.  “Smoking is related to the risk of getting severe Covid-19, as it is to a number of non-communicable diseases like cancers and cardiovascular disease. Now is the time to quit smoking.” 

Smokers who need help to stop smoking can call the NCAS Quitline at 011720 3145 or send a WhatsApp message on 0727664812.

[ENDS]

For further information, contact:

Sharon Nyatsanza: 079 666 1356 / 011 725 1514
Deputy Director of the National Council Against Smoking

ncasmedia@mweb.co.za 
The National Council Against Smoking is a leading not-for-profit organization working to promote public health by encouraging a tobacco-free society.

Notes to editor:

  1. Research article: Clift, A.K., et al. (2021) Smoking and COVID-19 outcomes: an observational and Mendelian randomisation study using the UK Biobank cohort. Thorax. https://thorax.bmj.com/content/early/2021/09/12/thoraxjnl-2021-217080

www.protectournext.co.za
@protectournext

IMAGES: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/gs1zifk9or7xhw9/AAB4NITRLeVQp6r3gcgWfsrza?dl=0

Media Contact:
Tamaryn Brown
Connect Media
084 3510560 / Tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za

A new initiative to #SwitchoffTobacco in Mamelodi launches this week. A dynamic team of Protect our Next ambassadors will be educating the Mamelodi community about the dangers of tobacco and e-cigarettes and explaining how the new Tobacco Control Bill will better protect communities. Community media and social channels will carry #SwitchoffTobacco discussions, while the ambassadors visit local schools, churches, taxi ranks, malls, traders and community hotspots over the next month with an engaging edutainment programme that encourages the whole community to pledge to be tobacco free.

Protect our Next is a partnership between South Africa’s leading health organisations, including the National Council Against Smoking (NCAS), the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA), the SA Medical Research Council (SAMRC) the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HFSA) and the South African Tobacco Free Youth Forum (SATFYF). Together, the organisations are united in educating communities about tobacco and campaigning for the new Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Services Bill to be passed to better protect the health of the nation.

“Tobacco use is still too high in South Africa. About 1 in 5 adults smoke, and this has a major impact on the health of communities and strains our health system,” says NCAS Deputy Director Sharon Nyatsanza. “More than 80% of smokers smoked their first cigarette in their teens, and most smokers wish they had never started. It’s clear that tobacco companies are active in the townships, targeting these markets. Communities like Mamelodi, a buzzing hotspot with an influx of people, need to protect themselves from tobacco industry manipulation and send a clear message that they will be tobacco-free. It’s up to communities to get involved and take action. We’re switching on Mams to switch off tobacco!”

“The earlier one starts to use tobacco and nicotine, the greater your risk for heart disease, strokes, other circulatory disorders and respiratory conditions,” says Dr Catherine Egbe, specialist scientist at SAMRC.“We know that the earlier children initiate tobacco use, the more difficult it will be for them to quit. The nicotine in tobacco and alternative products such as e-cigarettes is a highly addictive drug that can impact the development of the brains of young people.”

The Protect our Next team aims to roll out similar education and awareness initiatives in other communities across South Africa. The successful #protectournext schools education programme has also taken place in schools in Alexandra, Midrand and Ivory Park. Educators and community leaders welcomed the initiative, saying that children are both exposed to and experimenting with tobacco at a young age. “Many of our learners have parents and relatives who smoke. These education initiatives really help the children to understand the dangers and to better protect themselves, and we also hope they will take the message home,” says Vice Principal Patrick Ndange of Emfundisweni Primary School.

Nyatsanza says passing the proposed Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Services Bill, which is currently moving through its policy pathway in South Africa, is a vital part of better protecting communities. “The new Bill requires that any indoor public place is 100% smoke-free, and will make certain outdoor public places smoke-free too. It will further ban smoking in private dwellings used for commercial child care and educational activities, and in cars carrying children under 18. Cigarette advertising at tills and the sale of cigarette via vending machines, which is a channel for young people to access cigarettes would also be prohibited if this bill is passed into law.”

Importantly, the new Bill seeks to regulate e-cigarettes or vape products. “Our current legislation predates e-cigarettes and manufacturers have used the legislative vacuum to promote these devices and appeal to youth – including marketing e-liquids which come in a number of flavours to make them more appealing to young people,” says Dr. Egbe. “We must close the legislative gap and prevent a new generation from becoming addicted to nicotine.”

“Active, educated communities are vitally important in the fight against tobacco. Everyone can help by educating themselves and others about the risks,” says Nyatsanza. “It’s time to take back our health from big tobacco bullies.”

HOW YOU CAN PROTECT YOUR COMMUNITY FROM THE TOBACCO EPIDEMIC:

Follow @protectournext on social media and become a Tobacco Control Champion.
Educate yourself and others on the harms of nicotine and tobacco product use.
Show your support for the implementation of the Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill in South Africa.


protectournext

www.protectournext.co.za

Facebook and Twitter:@protectournext

Website: www.protectournext.co.za

Available for interview:

Dr Sharon Nyatsanza, Deputy Director, NCAS

Dr Catherine Egbe, Specialist Scientist: Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council

Lorraine Govender, National Advocacy Co-Ordinator, CANSA

Professor Pamela Naidoo, CEO, The Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa

Zanele Mthembu, Public Health Policy and Development Consultant

protectournext Activation Schedule:

Thuto Bothlale Secondary School:
Date: 20 October 2021

Time of Activation: 11:00 till 13:00

7945 Lehlwa Street, Nelmapius ,Ext 7

Contact person: Lucky – 0738169443

Nwavangani Primary School

Date: 21 October 2021

Time of Activation: 10:30 am till 13:30

Call Time: 10 am

Call Venue: Motamilenyora Street, Mamelodi East

Contact person: Lucky – 0738169443

Further Activity:

Schools ‘Next’ Programme
Churches
Taxi Drive
Stokvel Groups
Community Roaming Ambassadors
Community Hotspots (Parks and recreation)
Community media
Roaming billboards
Local radio and press
Protect our Next Smoke free paintings and murals
Traders and spaza shops – smoke-free vendors signs

Media contact:

Tamaryn Brown

Connect Media for CART agency

tamaryn@cart.agency

tamaryn@connectmedia.co.za

27 (0) 84 3510560